Month: September 2010

Internet Marketing Experiment, Part II: September

It’s been a slow month for internet marketing, but it’s still time for my monthly report about how things are going! With just a few hours left in September, my adsense earnings for the month stand at $1.92. Slightly depressing, but then, since I started this experiment on Aug 12th, I wasn’t expecting much in the way of results until mid-October in the earliest. Thus far I’ve made around $6 from my hub on why the government should forgive student loan debt, which is also my most popular hub with 170 facebook likes. In other earnings, I’ll be getting about $30 for writing on bright hub; this month I wrote about scheduling courses to support a PhD research project, citing and numbering sources in a dissertation, and getting a degree to teach math. I don’t count the $30 towards my internet marketing income because it’s a one-time payment, but I do count the $4 or so in residual income I’ll get from my bright hub articles; my top article is closing in on 300 views for the month, and the second place article isn’t far behind with 250. A few weeks ago, my main site got sandboxed; this is annoying, particularly since I was being careful, but not all that surprising since I was quickly moving up the rankings for financial keywords, so I expect I trigged an automatic...

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The Folly of Tax Cuts

During the 2000 presidential debates, when surpluses stretched as far as the eye could see and the debt was finally being paid off, then-governor George Bush argued that we needed to cut taxes to reduce government revenue, so that the debt wouldn’t be paid down too quickly. After the 2001 tax cuts guaranteed everlasting deficits (well, at least until 2010), the reasoning changed: tax cuts were now said to stimulate the economy; combined with accounting tricks, this allowed republicans to push through another batch of tax cuts in 2003. Fast forward to 2010, when the cumulative effect of the 2001 and 2010 tax cuts has been trillions in lost revenue. The 2009 stimulus bill, which economists said needed to be about $1.5 trillion in spending, ended up being $787 billion, a significant amount of which was devoted to tax cuts that were expected to have no real effect on the economy but were required to get the vote of the senators from Maine. Republicans, who object to (read: filibuster) every spending bill on the grounds of not adding to the debt, want to increase that same debt by another $700 billion over the next decade to continue Bush’s tax cuts for the rich that are largely responsible for the current debt. And they wonder why people don’t like politicians.. PS. To be clear, I’m in favor of tax cuts…when...

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What Google Thinks About You

Ran across this today and thought it was kind of interesting. When you have an adsense account, one of the things you can choose is whether or not to allow interest-based ads; in other words, advertising that’s based on the user’s search history rather than anything on your site. I have that turned off, because I’m currently targeting high value search terms and I want advertisements based on those; additionally, I want the user to see ads related to what they’re looking for right now, not what they were looking for a week ago. Anyway, I found out earlier today that you can see what Google thinks you’re interested in; just go to http://www.google.com/ads/preferences. According to Google, my interests are: Games – Board Games Games – Board Games – Miniatures & Wargaming Online Communities – Blogging Resources & Services I’m not sure where the minuatures and wargaming bit comes from, but the others certainly do fit what I’ve been reading about lately! (They probably also make me a lousy candidate for interest-based advertising; since I doubt any of those have a high CPC). You can also add interest categories yourself, so that you see advertisements for things you’re interested in; I took out wargames and put in abstract strategy games. Of course, if you don’t like being tracked like this, there’s also the option to disable your cookie and...

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