Author: William

Doing big things

Fans of Marvel movies know to wait around until the end of the credits to see the extra scene. This adds a bit of time to the theater experience, as the credits go on for quite some time; it takes hundreds of people to make a movie on that scale. At work, I’m one of a dozen developers on my team and one of several thousand developers in the company. While each team largely sets its own policies, there are some general standards for consistency across the company. Even relatively small side projects tend to involve several people. I’m currently finishing a small computer science textbook that I’ve been working on for the last few years. Even though I have a PhD, work experience in both writing and editing, and a tendency to do everything myself, my book still has a technical editor, a copy editor, and a graphic designer. I could certainly finish the book without any of those people, but they’ll help me to make it as good as it can be. In short, any project of significant complexity, even if it’s small enough to be done by one person, will benefit from having multiple sets of eyes. When multiple people are working on the same content, however, it’s important to have standards for consistency and for resolving disagreements. Sometimes this means there’s one person in charge...

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Thoughts on foster care

I recently gave an “intro to foster care” presentation. What was interesting is that I was trying to both encourage people to consider becoming foster parents, and discourage them from doing so. Why both? There’s always a shortage of good foster parents – people who really care about the kids and are willing to do whatever it takes to make sure the kids feel safe and have their needs met. At the same time, there are too many foster parents who don’t treat foster kids right. It’s not that they’re necessarily abusing kids, but they’re not willing to put in the effort to become trauma-informed or don’t treat the kids like they’re really members of the family. So I’m trying to increase the number of available foster parents, but only those who are reasonably confident that they can treat foster kids as their own. I emphasize this a lot in my talk – while you have the kids, they’re your kids and deserve to be treated like your kids. If you wouldn’t leave your biological kids out of something, you shouldn’t leave your foster kids out either. We recently re-opened our home for new placements (we closed after our daughter went home to ensure that we’d be available to support her and her mom as needed), but we’re being pretty selective in who we take because we need to...

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Finishing

November has been a crazy month for me. Despite the fact that I’ve been out of the state for eight days this month (and, of course, all the craziness surrounding the holidays) I’ve been doing NaNoWriMo. In NaNoWriMo, National Novel Writer’s Month, you commit to writing a novel during the month of November, where a novel is defined to be a story consisting of at least 50,000 words. You aren’t allowed to start until 12am on Nov 1 and must finish by 11:59pm on Nov 30. I’ve taken a stab at it twice in the past, but have never...

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Accessibility at Cream City Code

As promised, here are the slides from my Accessibility talk at Cream City Code. Aside from the links (which, if you saw the talk, are probably why you’re here) there’s a fair amount of extra detail in the presentation notes that I didn’t have time for in the talk. I saw people taking notes during the talk, which is great – this is stuff we need to be implementing! I’d like to particularly thank those people who actually heard me speak on this topic at That Conference last year and decided it was worth their time to come hear me again. Accessibility slides Share on...

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Applying leverage

I was reading a finance thread recently where the concept of leverage came up. Simply put, this is asking what activities get you the best “bang for your buck”. If you’re a minimum wage worker, then activities that save you money are a good use of time because the return is high compared to your hourly rate. If you’re making eight bucks an hour and can save $2 by spending ten minutes making your own lunch, or $10 by spending an hour sorting through coupons, then those activities essentially pay better than working. On the other hand, if you make six figures, those activities aren’t a good use of time (unless you like making your own lunch). In fact, it’s even financially sensible to pay others to do chores you might not enjoy, such as yard work, if it frees up time that you then apply to higher-paying projects. This applies at the business level as well. If task X takes a senior developer making $100 2 hours and a junior developer making $50k 3 hours, it makes more sense to assign it to the junior developer even though it will take longer. This has two benefits: the total cost of the task is lower, and it frees up the senior developer to work on projects that require his or her expertise. At a personal level, this also explains...

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