Author: William

Applying leverage

I was reading a finance thread recently where the concept of leverage came up. Simply put, this is asking what activities get you the best “bang for your buck”. If you’re a minimum wage worker, then activities that save you money are a good use of time because the return is high compared to your hourly rate. If you’re making eight bucks an hour and can save $2 by spending ten minutes making your own lunch, or $10 by spending an hour sorting through coupons, then those activities essentially pay better than working. On the other hand, if you make six figures, those activities aren’t a good use of time (unless you like making your own lunch). In fact, it’s even financially sensible to pay others to do chores you might not enjoy, such as yard work, if it frees up time that you then apply to higher-paying projects. This applies at the business level as well. If task X takes a senior developer making $100 2 hours and a junior developer making $50k 3 hours, it makes more sense to assign it to the junior developer even though it will take longer. This has two benefits: the total cost of the task is lower, and it frees up the senior developer to work on projects that require his or her expertise. At a personal level, this also explains...

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Thoughts on That Conference 2018

For the last few years, the beginning of August has meant one thing for me: That Conference! The joke eventually starts getting old, but the conference is always worth the time. 2018 was my fourth year attending and second year speaking. My favorite talks this year were the first two keynotes. When I saw the title of Jessica Kerr’s talk, “the Origin of Opera and the Future of Programming”, I assumed she meant the web browser. No – she actually meant Opera singing! This isn’t a topic that I have any interest in whatsoever…but Jessica’s enthusiasm actually made it interesting (and yes, she did relate it to programming). Then Cory House gave the keynote I was particularly looking forward to, on building a career; he talked about the tradeoffs he had to make to do what he does. Videos of both talks are available on the That Conference Facebook page. When I’m writing or speaking, I like to choose a topic that’s more conceptual than language X or program Y. Last year my talks were on accessibility (at That Conference) and sorting algorithms (at MKE.NET); this year my talk at That Conference was about graph theory and I’ll be speaking on accessibility again at Cream City Code. Over the last few years I’ve noticed that there are a lot of software developers who don’t have computer science degrees and...

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Setting Priorities

Assuming you get to set your own schedule, how do you choose what to work on next? Do you pick the most important task? The one with the closest deadline? The one most likely to make your boss (or significant other) happy? After I read about Kanban, I started trying to arrange my tasks such as to minimize the amount of work that I have in progress. My goal is to minimize the number of things that I am responsible for at any point in time. Obviously, this doesn’t mean that the highest-priority tasks don’t still get done first – I can’t imagine my team leader would be happy if I told him I was going to put off responding to a critical bug report for a week because I have too many low-priority tasks on my plate – but it means that I’ll try to prioritize finishing something that’s already started over starting something new. This results in less time for tasks overall, because you’re more likely to get back to things while they’re still partially cached in your memory, rather than having to get up to speed again before you can start working. I actually prefer to tackle the tasks that can be knocked off quickly before anything else, and get them through the process and off my plate entirely so they’re not taking up any mental...

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Communication in Software Development

At a meetup I was at recently, the speaker asked what we thought were the most important soft skills. My answer was English, or more generally, communication. Programming can be thought of as communicating with the computer – telling the system what we want it to do – but software development is often just as much about communicating with other people. Before we code, we (sometimes) write a design that lays out exactly what the code should do. When coding, we (hopefully) name our methods and variables, and sometimes even comment, in such a manner as to make it clear to the future reader (whether that be ourselves or another programmer) exactly what’s going on. After the code is complete, we may write testing instructions that should be clear as to exactly what behavior is expected from the code. These are all areas where many people get sloppy. The design doesn’t really explain what the new expected behavior is, the code is difficult to read, the testing instructions are essentially just “make sure it works.” Often much of this documentation fails to be complete sentences. The result is debate over whether or not the code is working correctly, because the stakeholders don’t have a shared understanding of what “working correctly” looks like. For the QAer, clarity can be even more important: a bug report is much more useful when...

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Missing indexes in Oracle

Some little details cause trouble entirely disproportionate to their importance. One such thing is a little quirk in how Oracle handles indexes. I have some code which gets a list of tables using a particular criteria and then gets all of the indexes associated with those tables. Under normal circumstances, the code works fine. However, when testing in a clean database, it will completely fail to find any of the associated indexes, even though they’ve been verified to exist. …or have they? It turns out that when the corresponding table does not contain any data, the index may still be associated with the table but it doesn’t really exist. So when you run a query like this: select * from dba_indexes ind join dba_segments s on ind.index_name=s.segment_name where ind.table_name=’MYTABLE’ It returns no results. Cue confusion. Adding a row to the table causes the index to actually be created and allows my script to start working correctly. Share on...

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