Author: William

Instant Family

Last week I finally got around to seeing Instant Family. If you’re not familiar with the movie, it follows a childless couple who decide to adopt out of foster care. As expected, crazy hijinks ensue. I have to say that I enjoyed the movie quite a bit. It has a lot of humor, while still (pretty) accurately representing what it’s like to be a foster parent. One thing to be aware of is that this movie is definitely from the foster parent perspective; it’s about how the foster parents fight through the process and (of course) come to learn that their kids are what was missing from their lives. If it was written from the foster child perspective it would be a very different (and probably much less funny) movie. From the perspective of the parents, their lives are being turned upside down because they now have three kids with behaviors that they aren’t prepared for and can’t control. From the perspective of the kids, their lives are turned upside down because they’ve been moved to a new home and don’t know what’s going to happen to them; almost everything in their lives is outside of their control. I don’t know if I would show this movie to (especially younger) foster kids – as I said, it’s not aimed at them and could be upsetting – but for people...

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On Writing

I’ve been working on a technical book for several years now. Partially, this is because I have a million things to do (coincidentally, my son just turned two). Partially this is because I’m a slow writer. And partially…it’s because writing is hard! Here are a few things to improve the process: Don’t write technical material in Word. Seriously, just don’t. Fortunately I learned this one many years ago – I used to type up my homework for my Algorithms class (due to my lousy handwriting) and it didn’t want long to determine that the effort to figure out LaTeX was less than the effort to get mathy things to work correctly in Word. Once you’ve written something, leave it along for a while and then print it out to proofread it. It’s amazing how many typos you can find once you’re looking at something in a different format and state of mind and can read what you wrote rather than what you meant to write. If at all possible, have somebody else read your work. Sentences that make complete sense to you might not work for someone else. If possible, get a reader who belongs to your target audience and can confirm that you’re not assuming background knowledge or ability that your readers won’t have. Don’t assume you know what your readers want. In my case, I was expecting...

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Doing big things

Fans of Marvel movies know to wait around until the end of the credits to see the extra scene. This adds a bit of time to the theater experience, as the credits go on for quite some time; it takes hundreds of people to make a movie on that scale. At work, I’m one of a dozen developers on my team and one of several thousand developers in the company. While each team largely sets its own policies, there are some general standards for consistency across the company. Even relatively small side projects tend to involve several people. I’m currently finishing a small computer science textbook that I’ve been working on for the last few years. Even though I have a PhD, work experience in both writing and editing, and a tendency to do everything myself, my book still has a technical editor, a copy editor, and a graphic designer. I could certainly finish the book without any of those people, but they’ll help me to make it as good as it can be. In short, any project of significant complexity, even if it’s small enough to be done by one person, will benefit from having multiple sets of eyes. When multiple people are working on the same content, however, it’s important to have standards for consistency and for resolving disagreements. Sometimes this means there’s one person in charge...

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Thoughts on foster care

I recently gave an “intro to foster care” presentation. What was interesting is that I was trying to both encourage people to consider becoming foster parents, and discourage them from doing so. Why both? There’s always a shortage of good foster parents – people who really care about the kids and are willing to do whatever it takes to make sure the kids feel safe and have their needs met. At the same time, there are too many foster parents who don’t treat foster kids right. It’s not that they’re necessarily abusing kids, but they’re not willing to put in the effort to become trauma-informed or don’t treat the kids like they’re really members of the family. So I’m trying to increase the number of available foster parents, but only those who are reasonably confident that they can treat foster kids as their own. I emphasize this a lot in my talk – while you have the kids, they’re your kids and deserve to be treated like your kids. If you wouldn’t leave your biological kids out of something, you shouldn’t leave your foster kids out either. We recently re-opened our home for new placements (we closed after our daughter went home to ensure that we’d be available to support her and her mom as needed), but we’re being pretty selective in who we take because we need to...

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Finishing

November has been a crazy month for me. Despite the fact that I’ve been out of the state for eight days this month (and, of course, all the craziness surrounding the holidays) I’ve been doing NaNoWriMo. In NaNoWriMo, National Novel Writer’s Month, you commit to writing a novel during the month of November, where a novel is defined to be a story consisting of at least 50,000 words. You aren’t allowed to start until 12am on Nov 1 and must finish by 11:59pm on Nov 30. I’ve taken a stab at it twice in the past, but have never...

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